NetChain: Scale-free sub-RTT coordination

NetChain: Scale-free sub-RTT coordination Jin et al., NSDI'18 NetChain won a best paper award at NSDI 2018 earlier this month. By thinking outside of the box (in this case, the box is the chassis containing the server), Jin et al. have demonstrated how to build a coordination service (think Apache ZooKeeper) with incredibly low latency … Continue reading NetChain: Scale-free sub-RTT coordination

SmoothOperator: reducing power fragmentation and improving power utilization in large-scale datacenters

SmoothOperator: reducing power fragmentation and improving power utilization in large-scale datacenters Hsu et al., ASPLOS'18 What do you do when your theory of constraints analysis reveals that power has become your major limiting factor? That is, you can’t add more servers to your existing datacenter(s) without blowing your power budget, and you don’t want to … Continue reading SmoothOperator: reducing power fragmentation and improving power utilization in large-scale datacenters

Skyway: connecting managed heaps in distributed big data systems

Skyway: connecting managed heaps in distributed big data systems Nguyen et al., ASPLOS'18 Yesterday we saw how to make Java objects persistent using NVM-backed heaps with Espresso. One of the drawbacks of using that as a persistence mechanism is that they’re only stored in the memory of a single node. If only there was some … Continue reading Skyway: connecting managed heaps in distributed big data systems

Espresso: brewing Java for more non-volatility with non-volatile memory

Espresso: brewing Java for more non-volatility with non-volatile memory Wu et al., ASPLOS'18 What happens when you introduce non-volatile memory (NVM) to the world of Java? In theory, with a heap backed by NVM, we should get persistence for free? It’s not quite that straightforward of course, but Espresso gets you pretty close. There are … Continue reading Espresso: brewing Java for more non-volatility with non-volatile memory

Watching for software inefficiencies with Witch

Watching for software inefficiencies with Witch Wen et al., ASPLOS'18 (The link above is to the ACM Digital Library, if you don’t have membership you should still be able to access the paper pdf by following the link from The Morning Paper blog post directly.) Inefficiencies abound in complex, layered software. These inefficiencies can arise … Continue reading Watching for software inefficiencies with Witch

WSMeter: A performance evaluation methodology for Google’s production warehouse-scale computers

WSMeter: A performance evaluation methodology for Google’s production warehouse-scale computers Lee et al., ASPLOS'18 (The link above is to the ACM Digital Library, if you don’t have membership you should still be able to access the paper pdf by following the link from The Morning Paper blog post directly.) How do you know how well … Continue reading WSMeter: A performance evaluation methodology for Google’s production warehouse-scale computers

The architectural implications of autonomous driving: constraints and acceleration

The architectural implications of autonomous driving: constraints and acceleration Lin et al., ASPLOS'18 Today’s paper is another example of complementing CPUs with GPUs, FPGAs, and ASICs in order to build a system with the desired performance. In this instance, the challenge is to build an autonomous self-driving car! Architecting autonomous driving systems is particularly challenging … Continue reading The architectural implications of autonomous driving: constraints and acceleration