Migrating a privacy-safe information extraction system to a Software 2.0 design

Migrating a privacy-safe information extraction system to a software 2.0 design, Sheng, CIDR'20 This is a comparatively short (7 pages) but very interesting paper detailing the migration of a software system to a 'Software 2.0' design. Software 2.0, in case you missed it, is a term coined by Andrej Karpathy to describe software in which … Continue reading Migrating a privacy-safe information extraction system to a Software 2.0 design

Programs, life cycles, and laws of software evolution

Programs, life cycles, and laws of software evolution, Lehman, Proc. IEEE, 1980 Today's paper came highly recommended by Kevlin Henney and Nat Pryce in a Twitter thread last week, thank you both! The footnotes show that the manuscript for this paper was submitted almost exactly 40 years ago - on the 27th February 1980. The … Continue reading Programs, life cycles, and laws of software evolution

Let's Encrypt: an automated certificate authority to encrypt the entire web

Let's encrypt: an automated certificate authority to encrypt the entire web, Aas et al., CCS'19 This paper tells the story of Let's Encrypt, from it's early beginnings in 2012/13 all the way to becoming the world's largest HTTPS Certificate Authority (CA) today - accounting for more currently valid certificates than all other browser-trusted CAs combined. … Continue reading Let's Encrypt: an automated certificate authority to encrypt the entire web

Watching you watch: the tracking system of over-the-top TV streaming devices

Watching you watch: the tracking ecosystem of over-the-top TV streaming devices, Moghaddam et al., CCS'19 The results from this paper are all too predictable: channels on Over-The-Top (OTT) streaming devices are insecure and riddled with privacy leaks. The authors quantify the scale of the problem, and note that users have even less viable defence mechanisms … Continue reading Watching you watch: the tracking system of over-the-top TV streaming devices

Cloudburst: stateful functions-as-a-service

Cloudburst: stateful functions-as-a-service, Sreekanti et al., arXiv 2020 Today's paper choice is a fresh-from-the-arXivs take on serverless computing from the RISELab at Berkeley, addressing some of the limitations outlined in last year's 'Berkeley view on serverless computing.' Stateless is fine until you need state, at which point the coarse-grained solutions offered by current platforms limit … Continue reading Cloudburst: stateful functions-as-a-service

POTS: protective optimization technologies

POTS: Protective optimization technologies, Kulynych, Overdorf et al., arXiv 2019 With thanks to @TedOnPrivacy for recommending this paper via Twitter. Last time out we looked at fairness in the context of machine learning systems, coming to the realisation that you can't define 'fair' solely from the perspective of an algorithm and the data it is … Continue reading POTS: protective optimization technologies

The measure and mismeasure of fairness: a critical review of fair machine learning

The measure and mismeasure of fairness: a critical review of fair machine learning, Corbett-Davies & Goel, arXiv 2018 With many thanks to Ben Fried and the ACM Queue editorial board for the paper recommendation. We've visited the topic of fairness in the context of machine learning several times on The Morning Paper (see e.g. [1]1, … Continue reading The measure and mismeasure of fairness: a critical review of fair machine learning