PlanAlyzer: assessing threats to the validity of online experiments

PlanAlyzer: assessing threats to the validity of online experiments Tosch et al., OOPSLA'19 It’s easy to make experimental design mistakes that invalidate your online controlled experiments. At an organisation like Facebook (who kindly supplied the corpus of experiments used in this study), the state of art is to have a pool of experts carefully review … Continue reading PlanAlyzer: assessing threats to the validity of online experiments

Local-first software: you own your data, in spite of the cloud

Local-first software: you own your data, in spite of the cloud Kleppmann et al., Onward! '19 Watch out! If you start reading this paper you could be lost for hours following all the interesting links and ideas, and end up even more dissatisfied than you already are with the state of software today. You might … Continue reading Local-first software: you own your data, in spite of the cloud

Formal foundations of serverless computing

Formal foundations of serverless computing Jangda et al., OOPSLA'19 Jangda et al. won a distinguished paper award at OOPSLA this year for their work on ‘Formal foundations of serverless computing.’ Central to the paper is their observation that the serverless execution environment has a number of unique properties (such as warm starting / reuse of … Continue reading Formal foundations of serverless computing

Taiji: managing global user traffic for large-scale Internet services at the edge

Taiji: managing global user traffic for large-scale internet services at the edge Xu et al., SOSP'19 It’s another networking paper to close out the week (and our coverage of SOSP’19), but whereas Snap looked at traffic routing within the datacenter, Taiji is concerned with routing traffic from the edge to a datacenter. It’s been in … Continue reading Taiji: managing global user traffic for large-scale Internet services at the edge

Scaling symbolic evaluation for automated verification of systems code with Serval

Scaling symbolic evaluation for automated verification of systems code with Serval Nelson et al., SOSP'19 Serval is a framework for developing automated verifiers of systems software. It makes an interesting juxtaposition to the approach Google took with Snap that we looked at last time out. I’m sure that Google engineers do indeed take extreme care … Continue reading Scaling symbolic evaluation for automated verification of systems code with Serval

Snap: a microkernel approach to host networking

Snap: a microkernel approach to host networking Marty et al., SOSP'19 This paper describes the networking stack, Snap, that has been running in production at Google for the last three years+. It’s been clear for a while that software designed explicitly for the data center environment will increasingly want/need to make different design trade-offs to … Continue reading Snap: a microkernel approach to host networking

The inflection point hypothesis: a principled approach to finding the root cause of a failure

The inflection point hypothesis: a principled debugging approach for locating the root cause of a failure Zhang et al., SOSP'19 It’s been a while since we looked a debugging and troubleshooting on The Morning Paper (here’s a sample of earlier posts on the topic). Today’s paper introduces a root cause of failure detector for those … Continue reading The inflection point hypothesis: a principled approach to finding the root cause of a failure